North Shore Land Alliance North Shore Land Alliance 2016-09-21T14:18:32Z http://northshorelandalliance.org/feed/atom/ WordPress Andrea Millwood <![CDATA[28-Acre Cushman Woods Preserve Created]]> http://northshorelandalliance.org/?p=3490 2016-06-24T14:39:24Z 2016-06-24T14:38:24Z On June 15th, a beautiful, 28-acre, heavily wooded parcel in the Village of Matinecock was purchased by the Land Alliance for conservation purposes. This acquisition would not have been possible without the incredibly generous support of Verena and Roderick H. Cushman, who donated the funds necessary to purchase this highly significant portion of the Beaver […]

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Verena and Roderic CushmanOn June 15th, a beautiful, 28-acre, heavily wooded parcel in the Village of Matinecock was purchased by the Land Alliance for conservation purposes. This acquisition would not have been possible without the incredibly generous support of Verena and Roderick H. Cushman, who donated the funds necessary to purchase this highly significant portion of the Beaver Brook watershed for use by the community.

The property, which will be named Cushman Woods, provides a critical habitat for birds, fox and a variety of wildlife species. It is tucked between Duck Pond Road, Piping Rock Road and Chicken Valley Road and is literally filled with old-growth trees, an abundance of native plants and a trail system that was once a popular fox hunting route for the Meadowbrook Hunt.

When asked why they chose to give this incredible gift to the community, the Cushmans said “we want to ensure that future generations have the opportunity to enjoy, care for and learn from this unique woodland habitat.”

In the 1920’s, the property was a part of the estate of Paul Cravath, a prominent Manhattan lawyer and a presiding partner of the law firm today known as Cravath, Swaine & Moore. The accompanying house, which has been purchased by a private individual, has historically been referred to as Still House. It was Cravath’s fourth home in the area, and he chose to have it made of brick because fires destroyed his first two, according to the blog Old Long Island.

The Land Alliance will soon begin the process of subdividing the house parcel from the land. Once it is completed we intend to restore the trails and maintain the property as a passive use preserve for walking, birding and nature exploration. Over time, we will evaluate the habitat and begin to remove invasive plants. We wholeheartedly welcome participation from the neighbors in these endeavors.

Carter Bales, Land Alliance Chair, said “The Cushman family represent the highest form of community leadership in their commitment to protecting the character of the North Shore. Such foresight and generosity are rare in our society today. We thank each member of the Cushman family for their commitment and leadership on the crucial issue of protecting our precious community from excessive development.”
Many, many thanks to Verena and Rod Cushman for their extraordinary generosity and unparalleled devotion to our community and its most important open spaces. And many thanks to Claudia and Gunnar Overstrom who brought this deal to the Land Alliance’s attention and hung in there through thick and thin until it was all done.

The serenity of Cushman Woods will be enjoyed for generations. The ecosystem services it provides, like recharging our groundwater, absorbing harmful carbon emissions and cleaning our air, will ensure a healthier community for all that follow us.

If you have any questions, please contact Lisa Ott at the Land Alliance at 516-626-0908.

 

 

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Andrea Millwood <![CDATA[Land Alliance Launched the Joyce and William O’Neil Steward Program]]> http://northshorelandalliance.org/?p=3499 2016-06-24T14:45:18Z 2016-06-24T14:14:29Z Thanks to a generous five-year endowment from the Joyce C. and William C. O’Neil Charitable Trust, the North Shore Land Alliance has launched a formal internship program. The program, modeled after the Student Conservation Association, is called the Joyce and William O’Neil Steward Program. Through this new program these interns, who were selected on a […]

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Thanks to a generous five-year endowment from the Joyce C. and William C. O’Neil Charitable Trust, the North Shore Land Alliance has launched a formal internship program. The program, modeled after the Student Conservation Association, is called the Joyce and William O’Neil Steward Program. Through this new program these interns, who were selected on a competitive basis, will gain a variety of skills from writing management plans for preserves, mapping trails, organizing volunteer and fundraising events, managing invasive plants, installing a woodland trail at Wawapek and educating the public about conservation. It is our hope that this experience with a variety of projects, will help the O’Neil Stewards build their job skills and inspire them to consider a career in conservation.

From a pool of highly qualified applicants, four college students were selected by four conservation professionals. Amanda Furcall, our talented internship coordinator, will manage the interns who will be working for 12 weeks over the summer and receiving a competitive stipend. For the Land Alliance, an organization whose land holdings are growing quickly, the Joyce and William O’Neil Stewards will provide much needed hands-on caring for our preserves.

We are very grateful to the Joyce C. and William C. O’Neil Charitable Trust for this fabulous opportunity to train the next generation of conservation stewards.

.2016 Internship Program Participants

2016 Joyce and William O’Neil Steward Program Participants

Joseph Murphy is a junior in Sustainability Studies at Hofstra University, where he co-founded and serves as treasurer to the Sustainability Club. He has been a leader in the Discovery Program when introducing new Hofstra stu­dents to State parks and the concepts of sustainability. He enthusiastically de­signed and maintains two on-campus vegetable gar­dens.

Conor O’Sullivan gradu­ated from Hunter College with a BA in Psychology and a minor in Environmental Studies. Conor’s interest in conservation has taken pre­cedence and he has worked for the Greenbelt Native Plant Center where he learned to collect and process na­tive seeds. Volunteering at the Hempstead Plains En­vironmental Education Center he removed invasive plants. With the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation he was an environmental educator and led teens on camping trips in the Adirondacks.

Jeb Polstien is a junior in the Environmental Studies department at Bowdoin Col­lege. Last summer he was a stewardship intern for the Land Conservancy of New Jersey where he learned many of the skills needed to excel at the Land Alliance. He has led outdoor education camps and spent a term in India studying urban agriculture.

Lauren Weller has just grad­uated from SUNY Cortland with a BA in Conservation Biology. She has organized large-scale volunteer projects for the Mahwah Environ­mental Organization as well as provided educational pro­grams for the community.

 

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Andrea Millwood <![CDATA[Enhanced Federal Tax Incentive is Permanent]]> http://northshorelandalliance.org/?p=3481 2016-06-24T14:06:46Z 2016-06-24T13:53:06Z The Land Alliance is pleased to announce that at the end of December 2015, Congress passed, with strong bipartisan support, legislation that makes the enhanced federal tax incentive that supports land conservation PERMANENT. Under the enhanced incentive, an individual landowner can deduct up to 50% of their adjusted gross income (AGI) in any year over […]

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The Land Alliance is pleased to announce that at the end of December 2015, Congress passed, with strong bipartisan support, legislation that makes the enhanced federal tax incentive that supports land conservation PERMANENT. Under the enhanced incentive, an individual landowner can deduct up to 50% of their adjusted gross income (AGI) in any year over a total of 16 years, including the year of the gift. Qualified farmers can deduct up to 100% of their AGI over 16 years.

The incentive is directly responsible for conserving more than two million acres of land throughout the United States and is retroactive to January 1, 2015. Lands placed into conservation easements continue to be privately owned and help conserve groundwater, surface water, wildlife habitat, farming and recreational opportunities. Conservation easements do not require public access and rely on tax incentives, providing a cost effective approach to conserving our community’s most valuable natural resources.

The Enhanced Federal Tax iIcentives were originally put into place in 2006 and we thank all of those in the community who have worked tirelessly to get this legislation passed. In particular, we’d like to thank Representatives Kathleen Rice, Peter King and Grace Meng in the United States House of Representatives and Senators Kirsten Gillibrand and Charles Schumer in the United States Senate. Our country loses three acres of land to development every minute and 1.5 million acres every year. Once the land is gone, it is gone forever.

You can read more government update in our 2016 Spring Conservation News newsletter.

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Andrea Millwood <![CDATA[Land Alliance Receives Two New Grants]]> http://northshorelandalliance.org/?p=3478 2016-06-24T13:39:01Z 2016-06-24T13:23:58Z On April 19, 2016, the North Shore Land Alliance received two separate grants totaling $45,000 from the New York State Conservation Partnership Program (NYSCPP) and New York’s Environmental Protection Fund. Those grants were a $25,000 grant for transaction costs associated with the expansion of Wawapek, a newly created preserve in Cold Spring Harbor (Town of […]

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On April 19, 2016, the North Shore Land Alliance received two separate grants totaling $45,000 from the New York State Conservation Partnership Program (NYSCPP) and New York’s Environmental Protection Fund. Those grants were a $25,000 grant for transaction costs associated with the expansion of Wawapek, a newly created preserve in Cold Spring Harbor (Town of Huntington, Suffolk County) and a $20,000 grant to cover the internship coordinator for the Joyce and William O’Neil Steward Program.

The $25,000 NYSCPP grant will support the Land Alliance’s 2015 acquisition of a three-acre property immediately adjacent to the newly created Wawapek. The Land Alliance is now working on a stewardship plan for the property that incorporates the newly acquired parcel into the existing preserve and effectively uses the expansion area to enhance/ promote public access as well as educational programming. The Land Alliance is also working with the Town of Huntington, which is in the process of acquiring a conservation easement on the property that it is perpetually preserved.  See page 10 of our 2016 Spring Conservation News newletter.

The $20,000 NYSCPP grant is a one-year grant which will cover the cost for the internship coordinator for the Land Alliance’s new Joyce and William O’Neil Steward Program. Over the past few years the Land Alliance has engaged a committed corps of volunteers who contribute as many as 1,000 hours toward the stewardship of our preserves each year. While we have in the past worked on a limited basis with students or recent graduates carrying out stewardship activities on our preserves, stipends and staff supervision have been very limited. This NYSCPP grant provides the Land Alliance with the ability to hire our former consultant Amanda Furcall as an internship coordinator. This in turn will greatly improve our program by mentoring college students and recent graduates, inspiring lifelong stewardship of the environment at home and in the larger world and engaging young people in hands-on service to the land. Through the presence of our coordinator and this program, we will be benefiting interns’ experiences as well as our preserves.

The NYSCPP is administered by the Land Trust Alliance, in coordination with the state Department of Environmental Conservation. In all, the Land Alliance has received 15 grants from NYSCPP over the past 13 years totaling $343,600.

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Andrea Millwood <![CDATA[Acquisition to Connect Shu Swamp Preserve to Upper Francis Pond Preserve]]> http://northshorelandalliance.org/?p=3562 2016-07-11T14:46:29Z 2016-06-23T14:19:16Z The North Shore Land Alliance has long been interested in acquiring and preserving approximately seven acres of land that connects Nassau County’s Upper Francis Pond Preserve (formerly known as Smithers Pond) to the south, with Shu Swamp Preserve to the north. In the past several months, the Land Alliance has been working with the owner […]

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The North Shore Land Alliance has long been interested in acquiring and preserving approximately seven acres of land that connects Nassau County’s Upper Francis Pond Preserve (formerly known as Smithers Pond) to the south, with Shu Swamp Preserve to the north. In the past several months, the Land Alliance has been working with the owner and their representatives to acquire the property. The Land Alliance is currently in contract and anticipates closing on this important acquisition by early summer of 2016.

The property is incredibly important from an ecological and environmental perspective: It consists of freshwater wetlands, underwater lands, a waterway that connects Upper and Lower Francis Ponds, pond frontage, mature woodlands, undeveloped uplands and existing trails that traverse the property. Aside from their ecological value and the fact that these parcels connect two existing preserves, the property is also an important viewshed along Beaver Brook

Road (there is nearly 1,700 feet of road frontage) and it is another seminal piece to the preservation puzzle that now includes the Humes property and will, we hope, include the Japanese Stroll Garden.

Once it is acquired, the Land Alliance will work with the Village of Mill Neck and other regulatory authorities to repair, improve and expand the existing trail so that the property can be publicly accessible and connect to the adjacent Shu Swamp Preserved.

Acquisition of the Smithers Connector Parcels to Connect Shu Swamp and Francis Pond Conservation Areas

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Andrea Millwood <![CDATA[Wawapek Preserve Expanded to Embrace Educational Purpose]]> http://northshorelandalliance.org/?p=2542 2016-03-24T01:46:57Z 2015-11-16T17:49:17Z The North Shore Land Alliance, in partnership with Suffolk County, the Town of Huntington, New York State, The Conservation Fund and the local community, acquired the 32-acre DeForest Williams property (now known as Wawapek), in March of 2015. Three months after closing, the Land Alliance opened Wawapek, formerly a private estate, as a public, passive […]

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The North Shore Land Alliance, in partnership with Suffolk County, the Town of Huntington, New York State, The Conservation Fund and the local community, acquired the 32-acre DeForest Williams property (now known as Wawapek), in March of 2015. Three months after closing, the Land Alliance opened Wawapek, formerly a private estate, as a public, passive use preserve.

Over the summer, the Land Alliance learned that the Williams Estate was interested in selling a three-acre property immediately to the north of Wawapek. The property is visibly connected to Wawapek and provides an important expansion opportunity along the entire northerly boundary of the preserve. If the three-acre parcel were not acquired and preserved, the quaint 1,200 square foot cottage, existing greenhouses and outbuildings would undoubtedly be torn down and replaced by a much larger modern house and other accessory structures which would negatively impact the rural character of our newly acquired preserve.

Page Dwyer, executor of the Williams Estate, was very kind to provide the Land Alliance with an exclusive opportunity to acquire the property before it went on the open market.

We are pleased to report that the Land Alliance signed a contract to purchase the property on October 30th. When acquired, the property will serve a number of important functions. It will increase the size of the preserve to 35 protected acres. The existing house could be transformed into a stewardship center and/or educational facility and potentially could be used for staff housing. The greenhouse could be used for propagating and growing plants to be used at our nearby Shore Road Sanctuary (formerly ExxonMobil) and other Land Alliance preserves, as well as a teaching tool in our Long Island Water Education Program.

The Land Alliance is now in contract to acquire the property and anticipates closing by the end of 2015. We are working with the Town of Huntington to secure up to 50% of the purchase price. Under the latest scenario being discussed, the Town would likely purchase a conservation easement and the Land Alliance would retain ownership of the land. We are so pleased to be able to partner once again with the Town of Huntington on an important conservation priority. If you haven’t made a visit to Wawapek yet, please do. The fall color is particularly beautiful right now.

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Andrea Millwood <![CDATA[The Land Alliance Long Island Water Education Program Expands to More Local Schools]]> http://northshorelandalliance.org/?p=2545 2016-04-01T02:14:25Z 2015-11-16T17:48:51Z Education is a core part of the Land Alliance’s mission. It is integral to helping community members understand the benefits associated with the preservation of Long Island’s land and waters and the important role land conservation plays in ensuring a healthy quality of life.  With nearly 3 million residents in Nassau and Suffolk Counties completely […]

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Education is a core part of the Land Alliance’s mission. It is integral to helping community members understand the benefits associated with the preservation of Long Island’s land and waters and the important role land conservation plays in ensuring a healthy quality of life.

 With nearly 3 million residents in Nassau and Suffolk Counties completely dependent on groundwater for all their fresh water needs, water is one of our community’s most precious and most vulnerable resources. Many Long Islanders are unaware that the source of their drinking water is the aquifer under their feet or that nitrogen is the number one contaminant of our aquifer, harbors, bays, streams and rivers, the Long Island Sound and the Atlantic Ocean. The Long Island Water Education Program teaches students about Long Island’s water: from the sole source aquifer that provides our drinking water, to the streams, wetlands, bays and Sound that constitute our watershed and make Long Island such a desirable place to live. In the classroom and on our nature preserves, the program uses hands-on interactive lessons to demonstrate the connection between protecting land and water, and engages students in their stewardship.

Initiated in 2014 through a generous grant from the Bruderman Family, the Long Island Water Education Program has reached more than 1,000 students in 2015 from four school districts across the North and South Shores. The program – designed by Land Alliance Educator, Karen Mossey, in conjunction with two highly experienced retired teachers, Anne Codey and Eileen Rossi – is a three-lesson series for fourth, fifth and sixth graders that addresses a sampling of Common Core/NYS Education Department standards. Each lesson can be carried out individually and the program can be adapted for use with other grades or with after-school students. The Long Island Water Education Program has consistently received very favorable feedback from teachers. It is a model for other water education programs on Long Island. As the demand for the program has grown, additional sources of funding are needed to ensure that the growing number of schools who request access to the program can be accommodated.

Thanks to a generous $40,000 grant received from the New York State Conservation Partnership program, our Water Education Program will continue for two additional years. This fall we expanded to include Great Neck and Valley Stream School Districts in addition to the five with which we launched the program during the 2014/15 school year. We plan to add additional school districts next spring. The fall 2015 field trips have shown off Shore Road Sanctuary in full seasonal glory, as the photo above demonstrates, and engaged students in beach exploration, permeability testing and grassland investigation and stewardship activities. Karen Mossey has been assisted at these events by a crew of talented and dedicated volunteers: Anne Codey, Amanda Furcall, Kathy Hannigan, Harmoni Kelley and Eileen Rossi.

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Andrea Millwood <![CDATA[Humes Property Closed on July 10th]]> http://northshorelandalliance.org/?p=2450 2016-03-24T02:08:47Z 2015-07-06T21:01:58Z As you may recall, we entered into contract in December of 2014 to purchase the 28-acre Humes Property in Mill Neck and have spent the past few months completing our necessary due diligence.  We are pleased to report that all testing has been successfully completed and we will move forward with closing on July 10th.  […]

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As you may recall, we entered into contract in December of 2014 to purchase the 28-acre Humes Property in Mill Neck and have spent the past few months completing our necessary due diligence.  We are pleased to report that all testing has been successfully completed and we will move forward with closing on July 10th.  Once the property has been acquired, we will work with our neighbors at the North Shore Wildlife Sanctuary and other local experts to formulate a plan for its use.

The property consists of open space (meadow, woodland and freshwater wetlands) along with nine residential structures.  It immediately adjoins preserved land owned by Nassau County, which the Land Alliance helped conserve and the larger Shu Swamp Preserve and Francis Pond conservation areas that consist of over 120 acres of preserved land.  These conserved areas and surrounding lands are the headwaters to a series of rivers, lakes and waterways (both freshwater and tidal) that eventually reach the Oyster Bay National Wildlife Refuge and the Long Island Sound.  Conservation of this property will help complete one of the most important wetland and open space corridors on the North Shore of Long Island and is the Land Alliance’s number one conservation priority in our 2014-2020 Draft Open Space Plan.  In acquiring the Humes property, the Land Alliance will conserve the property’s open space values, natural features  and scenic viewsheds.

In order to close on this acquisition in July we  reached out to conservation lenders and donors alike.  Approximately $3M in pledges and contributions has been raised to date. We will borrow the remaining $2.5M + in funds from The Conservation Fund, a national conservation organization that specializes in bridge loans for land trusts, and an anonymous donor over a three-year term.

Once the property is acquired we will continue our fundraising efforts in earnest and begin the stewardship and property management planning process.    We look forward to working with all involved parties to develop a plan that protects the conservation values of the property.  If you would like to be involved please contact us at 516.626.0908.  And, we very much hope that in the not too distant future the Humes Japanese Stroll Garden will be added to the mix!

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Andrea Millwood <![CDATA[2015 has been a successful year for both local land conservation and the North Shore Land Alliance.]]> http://northshorelandalliance.org/?p=2877 2016-03-24T02:12:00Z 2015-07-06T21:01:10Z Our  2015 Land Conservation Accomplishments: The acquisition of the 32-acre DeForest Williams property in Cold Spring Harbor was closed on March 10th. This was an $8.5 M public private partnership among the County of Suffolk, Town of Huntington, State of New York, North Shore Land Alliance and Cold Spring Harbor community. This acquisition created a public […]

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North Shore Land Alliance Long Island Water Education Program

    Our  2015 Land Conservation Accomplishments:

    • The acquisition of the 32-acre DeForest Williams property in Cold Spring Harbor was closed on March 10th. This was an $8.5 M public private partnership among the County of Suffolk, Town of Huntington, State of New York, North Shore Land Alliance and Cold Spring Harbor community. This acquisition created a public preserve in a densely populated area and is particularly important for water quality protection. The Land Alliance is also in contract to acquire an additional 3-acre parcel contingent to Wawapek for educational purposes.
    • The acquisition of the 28-acre Humes property in Mill Neck. The Humes property is the #1 most environmentally significant property in our community and connects three previously protected areas to create a 150-acre wetland and wildlife corridor. The Land Alliance is also very interested in purchasing the adjacent Humes Japanese Stroll Garden.
    • The transfer of ownership of 62 acres of preserves owned by The Nature Conservancy to the Land Alliance. Those preserves were the 42-Acre Hope Goddard Iselin Preserve, Upper Brookville, and the 20-acre Darwin James Preserve, Old Brookville. We also continued our work at the Shore Road Sanctuary (formerly the ExxonMobil property) by installing a pervious parking area flanked by rain gardens to enhance wildlife habitat.
    • Co-sponsorship of the 2015 Long Island Food Conference, a day-long conference at Hofstra University with the intent of empowering people to grow food in suburban locations.
    • The launch of the Long Island Water Education Program in local schools which helped more than 1,500 public school children learn about Long Island’s sole source aquifer, watersheds, water conservation, native plants and the connection between land and abundant clean water.
    • Continued community outreach to broaden the Land Alliance’s membership base by hosting a dozen Walks in the Woods, six fundraising events and various conservation-oriented publications.
    • In total, the Land Alliance grew its inventory of protected lands by 122 acres and increased membership by 196 new families.

    The North Shore Land Alliance today is far more effective and far more credible in the cause of open space protection than we were a decade ago. But there is much more to do and we continue to rely on the help of our community to reach our goal of protecting an additional 1,500 acres of the North Shore’s remaining open space in the next several years.

    2015 was our best year yet and we know with your continued support 2016 can be even better! For more information about the Land Alliance please contact us at 516-626-0908.

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    Andrea Millwood <![CDATA[Our 2015 Annual Members Meeting]]> http://northshorelandalliance.org/?p=2548 2016-04-01T02:23:23Z 2015-07-06T21:00:29Z The Land Alliance held its Annual Members Meeting on Saturday, October 24, 2015 at the Locust Valley Public Library. This was our largest Annual Members Meeting to date, with more than 50 members in attendance. Board Chair Carter Bales welcomed members and talked about the Land Alliance’s vision for the future. Hal Davidson, Co-Chairman of the […]

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    The Land Alliance held its Annual Members Meeting on Saturday, October 24, 2015 at the Locust Valley Public Library. This was our largest Annual Members Meeting to date, with more than 50 members in attendance. Board Chair Carter Bales welcomed members and talked about the Land Alliance’s vision for the future.

    Hal Davidson, Co-Chairman of the Committee on Trustees, conducted the election of Trustees, where the following individuals were elected for three-year terms running from 2015 until 2018:

    New Trustees elected for a first term were

    • John Casaly
    • Christoph Cushman
    • Chris Hagedorn
    • Nicholas Paumgarten
    • Jean Thatcher

     

    Returning Trustees were

    • Carter Bales
    • Rosemary Bourne
    • John Bralower
    • Matt Bruderman
    • Augusta Donohue
    • Nancy Douzinas
    • George Eberle
    • Hoyle Jones
    • Clarence Michalis
    • Jonathan Moore
    • Luis Rinaldini
    • Julie Rinaldini
    • Larry Schmidlapp
    • Ray Schuville
    • Peri Wenz
    • Tom Zoller

    In total, 122 votes were received from both the floor and one vote cast by Lisa Ott, Land Allliance President, on behalf of the members who had voted by proxy, thus completing the successful election process.

    Lisa went on to give a brief account of the Land Alliance’s progress in 2015, which included the following:

    • The acquisition of the 32-acre DeForest Williams property, Cold Spring Harbor, which closed on March 10th. This was an $8.5 million public private partnership among the County of Suffolk, Town of Huntington, State of New York, Land Alliance and Cold Spring Harbor community. This acquisition creates a public preserve in a densely populated area and is particularly important for water quality protection. Lisa also indicated the Land Alliance’s excitement about acquiring an additional three-acre parcel contingent to Wawapek for educational purposes.
    • The acquisition of the 28-acre Humes property in Mill Neck. The Humes property is the #1 most environmentally significant unprotected property in our community and connects three previously protected areas to create a 150-acre wetland and wildlife corridor. Lisa also voiced the Land Alliance’s interest in purchasing the adjacent Humes Japanese Stroll Garden.
    • The transfer of ownership of 62 acres of preserves owned by The Nature Conservancy to the Land Alliance. Those preserves are the 42-acre Hope Goddard Iselin Preserve, Upper Brookville, and the 20-acre Darwin James Preserve, Old Brookville. We also continued our work at the Shore Road Sanctuary by installing an entrance, pervious parking area and rain gardens to absorb stormwater runoff.
    • Co-sponsorship of the 2015 Long Island Food Conference, a day-long conference at Hofstra University, with the intent of empowering people to grow food in suburban locations.
    • The launch of a water education program in local schools, which is helping more than 1,500 public school children learn about Long Island’s sole source aquifer, watersheds, water conservation, native plants and the connection between land and abundant clean water.
    • Continued community outreach to broaden the Land Alliance’s membership base by hosting a dozen Walks in the Woods, six fundraising events and various conservation-oriented publications.
    • In total, the Land Alliance grew its inventory of protected lands by 122 acres and increased membership by 194 new families.

    All in all, it was a very good year for the North Shore Land Alliance and for local conservation. Lisa Ott thanked our members for their support and introduced featured speaker Dr. Diane Lewis, healthy living activist and author of The Great Healthy Yard Project.

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